Monday, December 10, 2012

Under the Never Sky by Veronica Rossi


Exiled from her home, the enclosed city of Reverie, Aria knows her chances of surviving in the outer wasteland - known as The Death Shop - are slim. If the cannibals don't get her, the violent, electrified energy storms will. She's been taught that the very air she breathes can kill her. Then Aria meets an Outsider named Perry. He's wild - a savage - and her only hope of staying alive.
A hunter for his tribe in a merciless landscape, Perry views Aria as sheltered and fragile - everything he would expect from a Dweller. But he needs Aria's help too; she alone holds the key to his redemption. Opposites in nearly every way, Aria and Perry must accept each other to survive. Their unlikely alliance forges a bond that will determine the fate of all who live under the never sky.
~Goodreads


Publisher: HarperCollins
Number of Pages: 374
Type: Hardcover

Reviewed by Rachel, age 17

Under the Never Sky is the perfect blend of dystopian and sci-fi. It alternates points of view between Aria, a girl who has lived in shelter from the Never Sky all her life, and Perry, an outsider who has learned to live with its violence. The two need each other to get back what they lost, which leads them on a grand journey full of action and adventure set in a world you’ve never read before.

This book would appeal to lovers of The Hunger Games, Graceling, Matched and Divergent. And because of it’s alternating perspectives between Perry and Aria, Under the Never Sky would appeal to both boys and girls, as there is enough action and gradual romance to satisfy everyone.

One thing I loved most about this book was the stark contrast between super high-tech inventions where Aria lives and the cavemen times where Perry lives. On top of that, there’s the ethereal Never Sky where the Aether storms could strike any day, giving the book a fantasy edge, and where disease roams without a cure. The Aether brings out new genes in the outsiders, giving some of them special talents like smelling emotions, hearing really well, and seeing in the dark. (They get cool names like Scires, Auds, and Seers)

The second thing I loved was that the relationship between Aria and Perry was not insta-love (which let’s be real, everybody hates). In fact, for the first 150 pages the two hate each other--and their hatred could not be funnier! Perry, who is a hunter and a man of few words, is the worst match for Aria, who has never been in the real world and has never felt fear or pain. She loves words and questions everything. Their love blooms gradually and in the end leaves readers rooting for the two of them to succeed.

Both fortunately and unfortunately, the ending leaves readers hanging with many unanswered questions and fates. There is also so much more to learn about Perry, for he is truly the most unique and lovable character in this entire book, despite his rough edges. And Aria, whose life takes on many unexpected twists and turns I did not see coming!

Probably the only negative thing about this book was that it somewhat followed suit with most dystopian novels: someone from inside the society meets someone from outside, they fall in love, then they find out there is a place beyond control of the society and they go on a journey to find it or retrieve it. However, I think what makes this book so good, despite that plot line, is because you don't know which is more powerful, the outside or the inside, and there's a supernatural/sci-fi aspect to it with the aether sky, as well as the fact that the society, even though there are bad people within it, are not necessarily bad, they are just trying to survive. 

Because this book crosses so many genres, it would appeal to anyone looking for a different read. Its sequel, Through the Ever Night, is highly sought after and releases this January. 

This book is in stores now!
Buy Hardcover | $17.99

Happy reading!
Rachel 

3 comments:

  1. I never fail to get this series mixed up with Beth Revis' Across the Universe series. *sulks* I love all things sci-fi, dystopian...and alternating perspectives...I'm sold.

    I am slightly worried about the unanswered questions part though, that can make me feel like flipping tables more often than not just because it often feels like lazy writing, or it keeps me from being able to suspend my disbelief.

    Also nice to know that there's action to satisfy the boyish reading tastes that I lean towards.

    YES! NO INSTALOVE. Funny how I still eat up instalove in romance novels and korean dramas...

    Lilian @ A Novel Toybox

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    Replies
    1. Luckily this ending wraps up nicely thought instead of being cut off randomly--which I hate!

      Oh instalove can definitely have its shining moments...just not in this book!

      P.S. I LOVED ACROSS THE UNIVERSE!!!!!!!!

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    2. I love endings that wrap up nicely. There are books that wrap up like a cliffhanger...*points to Robison Wells' Feedback* I thought FOR SURE there would be another book because that ending was...ARGH. *flips table*

      If you loved Beth Revi's across the universe, I think you'll love Anna Sheehan's A Long, Long Sleep! (have you read it?)

      Lilian @ A Novel Toybox

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